Glove Taps

film no. 152


technical details:

Production K-6.

Release no. C-586.

Filmed January 11 to 30, 1937. See the 'miscellaneous' section below for details.

Title sheet prepared by Elmer Raguse on February 17, 1937.

Cutting continuity submitted February 17, 1937.

Negative shipped on February 17, 1937.

Music cue sheet prepared on February 19, 1937.

According to Maltin & Bann, this film was released on February 20, 1937, making it the 152nd film in the series to be released. However, it seems apparent that delays due to Spanky's illness led to the film being released around the time of the copyright date. Early in the film season, Fred Quimby of MGM had set a projected release date for this production of January 30, 1937.

Copyrighted March 9, 1937, by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures Corporation. Registration no. LP6983. Renewed July 27, 1964, with registration no. R341915. This copyright is currently due to expire at the end of 2032.

All-talking one-reeler.

Opening title: 'Hal Roach presents Our Gang in "Glove Taps".'

King World Productions episode no. 46a, available in both colorized and original black-and-white versions.


the crew:

Produced by Hal Roach
Credited in the film as a presenter.
Directed by Gordon Douglas
This credit appears in the film.
Assistant Director: Charles Oelze
This credit derives from production documents.
Photography: Art Lloyd, A. S. C.
This credit appears in the film.
Film Editor: William Ziegler
This credit appears in the film.
Sound: William Randall
This credit appears in the film.
Prop Men: Bob Saunders and Goode
These credits derive from the production sheets. Goode is verified for the 25th and 26th, after which Saunders took over.
Script Clerks: Ellen Hansen and Morton
These credits derive from the daily film reports, which don't provide Morton's last name. Hansen was present on the 11th and 12th, while Morton was present thereafter. Hansen was later known as Ellen Corby.
Released by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Indicated in the opening title card.
Passed by the National Board of Review
As indicated in the film.
Western Electric System
As indicated in the film.
Approved by the Motion Picture Producers & Distributors of America
Certificate no. 3020.
studio personnel
vice president in charge of production - S. S. Van Keuren
secretary-treasurer - Mat O'Brien
Roach's assistant on production activities - Lawrence Tarver
assistant secretary-treasurer, comptroller - Hugh Huber
film editor and sound department - Elmer Raguse
casting - Joe Rivkin
story department - Jack Jevne
art department - Arthur I. Royce
property department - W. L. Stevens
process department - Roy Seawright
still photographer - Bud "Stax" Graves
musical director - Marvin Hatley
men's wardrobe - Harry Black
paymaster - Mrs. Grace Cash
transportation director - Bob Davis
school teacher - Fern Carter
possible uncredited involvement
writing - Hal Yates, James Parrott, Hal Law, Felix Adler, Harry Langdon, Richard Flournoy and Gordon Douglas may have been among the gag writers.
property department - Charles Oelze was probably involved in this capacity.
animation - Probably the work of Roy Seawright.

the kids:

Carl "Alfalfa" Switzer as "Alfalfa"
Lead role. He unwittingly finds himself in the boxing ring with the new bully in town. His fighting name in "The Oklahoma Wildcat."
George "Spanky" McFarland as "Spanky"
Featured role. He trains Alfalfa and serves as referee during the boxing match.
Tommy "Butch" Bond as "Butch Raffety"
Featured role. He's the bully that's just moved in.
Billie "Buckwheat" Thomas as "Buckwheat"
Supporting role. He knocks Alfalfa out in their practice bout. One of the production sheets refers to him as "Buckie."
Eugene "Porky" Lee as "Porky"
Supporting role. He accompanies Buckwheat pretty much throughout the film.
Sidney Kibrick as "Woim"
Supporting role. He accompanies Butch throughout the film and serves as his trainer. The script refers to him as "The Woim."
Darwood Kaye
Bit part. He's dressed as "Waldo," but unnamed in this film. He sits next to Butch's crowd during the match, but is happy when Alfalfa wins and dumps a bucket of water over Woim's head.
Darla Hood as "Darla"
Bit part. She's seen briefly saying goodbye to Spanky.
Jerry Tucker
Extra. He's one of the boys Butch talks to, and is also seen near Alfalfa's corner of the boxing ring.
Rex Downing
Extra. He's one of the boys Butch talks to, and is also seen near Alfalfa's corner of the boxing ring.
Harold Switzer
Extra. He's one of the boys Butch talks to, and is sitting behind Jerry at the boxing match.
John Collum
Extra. He sits between Jerry and Rex at the boxing match.
Donald Proffitt
Extra. He's one of the boys Butch talks to, but I haven't spotted him at the boxing match.
Robert Winckler
Extra. Maltin & Bann list him as Robert Winkler. He's at the left side in the shots of the boys that support Butch.
Bobs Watson
Extra. Not listed by Maltin & Bann, but it looks to me like he's one of the boys near Alfalfa's corner of the ring.
Joe Levine
Extra. He's the boy with the frizzy hair seen in the front row near Butch's corner.
boy 148
Extra. He's standing in back as Butch talks to the boys, but I haven't spotted him at the boxing match.
Hugh Sheridan
Extra. He appears to be the boy in the crowd right behind Alfalfa as he's tangled in the ropes.
Jackie Lindquist
Extra. He appears to be the blonde boy right behind Hugh Sheridan.
Larry Harris
Extra. He sits to the far right among Butch's supporters.
girl 148
Extra. She's the first girl on the left to exit the classroom.
Baby Patsy May
She's not in the film itself, but her photo is shown during the opening titles.
other kids
Extras. Maltin & Bann list Hugh Chapman, but I can't spot him anywhere in the film. There are perhaps 25 more boys at the boxing match, which perhaps includes all of the boys seen outside the school. At least five more boys, besides Winckler, are rooting for Butch. There are also at least four more girls seen outside the school.

the animals:

Leo
Bit part. The MGM lion appears at the opening of the film.
Pete the Pup IV
He's not actually in the film, but his photo is shown during the opening titles. Documentation, however, reveals that he was due to work on Jan. 13th, the day on which filming was postponed. Production sheets for the 25th and 26th also state that a dog was used, but don't give a name.

the adults:

There are no adults in this film.


the music:

"Good Old Days" by Leroy Shield
Copyrighted Jan. 10, 1931.
(A16.) This version is played over the opening titles, and was arranged by Ted Duncan.
(A17.) This version is played as Alfalfa wins the match and the end title appears.
"Change My Clothes" by T. Marvin Hatley
Copyrighted Mar. 4, 1937. This is played as the kids walk out of the classroom and meet Butch and Woim.
"Stage-Coach Conversation" by T. Marvin Hatley
Copyrighted Mar. 20, 1937. This is played as Alfalfa realizes he's going to fight Butch.
"Up In Room 14" by Leroy Shield
This is played as Alfalfa jogs and is weighed, and Buckwheat and Porky arrive with the stretcher.
"It Is To Laugh" by Leroy Shield
Copyrighted 1930. This is played during the rub-down and the shadow boxing. This is the version heard in "Pay As You Exit" (no. 148).
"Hot And Dry" by Leroy Shield
This is played during Alfalfa's sparring match with Buckwheat.
"Spring" by T. Marvin Hatley
Copyrighted June 13, 1935. This is the music that accompanies Alfalfa's dream.
"The Gong Song" by T. Marvin Hatley
Copyrighted Sep. 19, 1936. Written with lyrics by Walter Bullock. An instrumental version is played from the time Alfalfa awakens from his dream until he's wrapped up in the ropes.
"Here Comes The Wagon And Stage Coach" by T. Marvin Hatley
This is played during the second round until Butch gets knocked out.

unused music
"Frühlingslied" aka "Spring Song" by Felix Mendelsohn
No. 6, Allegretto grazioso in A major, from Opus 62, "Songs Without Words" for piano, Book 5. The six songs of this opus were written between 1842 and 1844. Apparently, the Our Gang unit planned to use this piece for the scene where Alfalfa is dreaming after being knocked out by Buckwheat. However, it's apparent that Hatley decided to write his own piece for this part of the film, though it sounds like Hatley's melody derives from a short succession of notes that can be found about midway through Mendelsohn's piece.

the locations:

Hal E. Roach Studios
All of the shooting for this film took place on Stage 4, with the possible exception of Jan. 11th, which was nevertheless on one of the stages at the studio.

miscellaneous:

Eight shooting dates went into the making of this film. Here's a breakdown of the activity, deriving from the call sheets, production sheets, daily film reports and various memos:
Jan. 6 - A Raguse memo from this date indicates that "Glove Taps" was the official title of the film. It seems likely that the date was meant to be Feb. 6, however, since the production documentation reveals that the film was untitled during shooting.
Jan. 8 - A surviving script carries this date.
Jan. 9 - Film costs for the previous week were $833.23.
Jan. 11 - This was the first day of shooting. Present were the five main kids, plus Tommy Bond, Sid Kibrick, 17 extras, and two school teachers. Shooting took place on an unspecified stage, which was almost certainly Stage 4. Joe Rivkin memos to Van Keuren, O'Brien, Huber and Cash, from this date state that the five main kids and Tommy Bond 'started' on this date.
Jan. 12 - This was the second day of shooting. Present were Alfalfa, Buckwheat, Porky, Tommy Bond, Sid Kibrick, and 3 extras. Spanky was listed as 'ill' on this date, though it isn't clear whether he became ill during the shooting or missed out on it entirely. Shooting took place on Stage 4.
Jan. 13 - This would have been the third day of shooting, but Spanky's illness postponed production until the 25th. Scheduled to work on this day were the four main boys, Tommy Bond, Sid Kibrick, Donald Proffitt, Harold Switzer, Rex Downing, and Pete the Pup. Shooting was to take place on the school set on Stage 4.
Jan. 16 - Film costs for the previous week were $1668.17, bringing the total to $2501.40 so far.
Jan. 18 - A Rivkin memo to Van Keuren, O'Brien, Huber and Cash, states that Tommy Bond was 'closed' as of Jan. 16th.
Jan. 25 - This was the third day of shooting. Scheduled were the five main kids, plus Tommy Bond, Sid Kibrick, Don Proffitt, Harold Switzer, Rex Downing, 12 assorted boys and girls, and a dog. Shooting was to take place on the school and barn sets on Stage 4. The production sheet reveals that 16 extras were used for the film, which is one more than originally planned. Also present were two school teachers, but the dog isn't mentioned. It was decided on this day that a portion of the footage from the 11th and 12th would be salvaged. A Tarver memo to Raguse from this date (copied to Van Keuren) requests clearance of Mendelsohn's "Spring Song" for instrumental use in this film.
Jan. 26 - This was the fourth day of shooting. Scheduled were the four main boys, Tommy Bond, Sid Kibrick, and a dog. Shooting was to take place on the barn set on Stage 4. The production sheet reveals that Sid was absent, and that 3 extras and a school teacher were present. The dog isn't mentioned. Darla was on standby.
Jan. 27 - This was the fifth day of shooting. Scheduled were the four main boys, Tommy Bond, Sid Kibrick, 15 tough looking boys, and 25 boys ranging in age from 6 to 10 years. Shooting was to take place in the fight arena and the barn set on Stage 4. The production sheet reveals that 29 extras and 3 school teachers were present, and that Darla was on standby. A Raguse memo to Tarver from this date (copied to Van Keuren) relays a wire from Mr. Decker stating that "Spring Song" was in the public domain provided a new arrangement was used.
Jan. 28 - This was the sixth day of shooting. Scheduled were the four main boys, Tommy Bond, Sid Kibrick, 15 tough looking boys, and 13 boys ranging in age from 6 to 10 years. Shooting was to take place in the fight arena and the barn set on Stage 4. The production sheet reveals that 27 extras and 3 school teachers were present, and that Darla was on standby.
Jan. 29 - This was the seventh day of shooting. Scheduled were the four main boys, Tommy Bond, Sid Kibrick, plus whichever extras were recalled from the set by the assistant director. Shooting was to take place in the fight arena and the barn set on Stage 4. It was also planned that shooting would begin the next morning for "Hearts Are Thumps" (no. 153), but this didn't happen. The production sheet reveals that 26 extras and 3 teachers were present, as well as Darla, though she may have been on standby. A Raguse memo from this date indicates that the main titles for the film were completed with the crew credits intact.
Jan. 30 - This was the final day of shooting. Scheduled were the four main boys, Tommy Bond, and Darla. It was decided that the extra kids would not be called back on this day. Shooting was to take place in the arena and the barn set on Stage 4. It was also planned that shooting would begin Monday morning, Feb. 1st, for "Hearts Are Thumps," but it was actually postponed another day. The production sheet reveals that Darla was not present, but there was a school teacher there. Film costs for the previous week were $3070.54, bringing the total to $5571.94 so far.
Feb. 1 - The production sheet for this date states that production closed as of Jan. 30th. Nevertheless, the sheet lists Douglas, Oelze, Saunders and Lloyd, so presumably they were busy working in post-production on this date.
Feb. 6 - Film costs for the previous week were $262.56, bringing the total to $5834.50 so far.
Feb. 16 - A memo from this date states that the domestic positive Movietone print was shipped to W. D. Kelly in New York.
Feb. 17 - A memo from this date states that the domestic negative and domestic negative soundtrack were shipped to the MGM lab.
Mar. 2 - A memo from this date states that the Canadian negative and Canadian negative soundtrack was delivered.

Press information from this period reveals that the Gang had acquired their own pediatrician, Dr. Henry Dietrich.

The negative cost on this film as of Apr. 24, 1937, was $23,664.53. This amount was certified on May 25, 1937.

Alfalfa trains at the Ajax Athaletic Club.

Spanky reads from a book entitled How To Be A Fighter - 10 Easy Lessons.

This film is 975 feet in length.

The script submitted to MGM was given the catalog number B433.


availability:

The Little Rascals Remastered & Unedited Vol. 5 (VHS) from Cabin Fever and
The Little Rascals Remastered & Unedited Volume One (4 LD set) from Cabin Fever
Released July 6, 1994. Also released as part of 12 VHS boxed set. This is a nearly complete print, missing only the MGM lion. The picture quality is excellent. The total footage lasts 10:28. This version has appeared on numerous bootlegs.
The Little Rascals Volume '5: Collector's Edition (VHS) from Hallmark Home Entertainment
Released Aug. 15, 2000. Also included as part of The Little Rascals Volumes 1-5: Collector's Edition (5 VHS set) and The Little Rascals Volumes 1-10: Collector's Edition (10 VHS set), both released Aug. 15, 2000.
The Little Rascals Remastered & Unedited Vol. 5 & Vol. 6 (DVD) from Cabin Fever
Same contents as the Cabin Fever VHS releases. Also released as part of The Little Rascals Remastered & Unedited (6 DVD set).
The Little Rascals - The Complete Collection (8 DVD set) from Genius Products
Released late Oct. 2008. This is identical to the Cabin Fever version.
The Little Rascals Book XV (VHS) from Blackhawk Video
This is a home movie print from Blackhawk. The opening title and crew credits are remade, but the end title is original. The picture quality is very good. The original footage totals 10:12, but the original soundtrack lasts an additional 0:21.
The Little Rascals Two Reelers Vol. 2 (VHS) from Spotlite Video
This is the Blackhawk print, but with the company name blacked out. It was also included as part of a 6 VHS boxed set.
The Best Of The Little Rascals (LD) from Republic Pictures Home Video
Released 1989. This is the Blackhawk print.
Adventures Of The Little Rascals (VHS) from Republic Pictures Home Video

© Robert Demoss.


My thanks to the following people for assisting with this page:
Rob Stone (for providing the production number)
Joe Moore (for providing the copyright information)
Piet Schreuders (for identifying "Stage-Coach Conversation")
Steven R. Wright (for identifying Joe Levine)
Paul Mular (for providing info on the Cabin Fever laserdiscs)


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